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Author: Dennis Partridge

Alamance County North Carolina Directories

The earliest city directory for Alamance County, North Carolina was published in 1910 by Piedmont Directory Company of Burlington and Asheville, North Carolina. Starting in 1920 these city and business directories continued approximately every two years until the modern day telephone book would replace them. This page provides a listing of online directories for Almance County, North Carolina; while most are available for free, there are some years that I can only locate at Ancestry (1937, 1939, 1941, 1954 and 1957) At the bottom of this page are several church directories independently published, that are viewable online.

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1740 Chowan County North Carolina Jury List

Chowan County was formed in 1670 as a precinct in Albermarle County. It was named in honor of an Indian tribe, Chowanor, which lived in the northeastern part of the Colony. It is in the northeastern section of the State and is bounded by Albermarle Sound, Chowan River and Bertie, Hertford, Gates and Perquimans counties. The present area is 180 square miles. In 1720 Edenton which was named in honor of Governor Charles Eden was established. In 1722 it was designated and has continued to be the county seat. There was no description of the precinct when it was...

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Gaston County, North Carolina Biographies

Biographical Sketches of Western North Carolina Illustrating Principally the Revolutionary Period of Mecklenburg, Rowan, Lincoln and Adjoining Counties of Burke, Cabarrus, Cleaveland, Gaston, Iredell, and Wilkes. The biographies have been extracted from this manuscript and presented here as part of our larger biographies collection. As with most historical manuscripts, these biographies should provide a glimpse into the genealogy of the leading men and the occasional women of the western North Carolina area. Biographical Sketch of Captain Samuel Caldwell Biography of Rev. Humphrey...

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Cabarrus County, North Carolina History

Cabarrus county was formed in 1792, from Mecklenburg county, and was named in honor of Stephen Cabarrus, a native of France, a man of active mind, liberal sentiments, and high standing in society. He entered public life in 1784, and was frequently elected a member from Chowan county, and, on several occasions, Speaker of the House of Commons. The Colonial and Revolutionary history of Cabarrus is closely connected with that of Mecklenburg county. No portion of the State was more fixed and forward in the cause of liberty than this immediate section. In the Convention at Charlotte, on the 20th of May, 1775, this part of Mecklenburg was strongly represented, and her delegates joined heartily in pledging “their lives, their fortunes and most sacred honor” to maintain and defend their liberty and independence. The proceedings of that celebrated Convention, its principal actors, and attendant circumstances, will be found properly noticed under the head of Mecklenburg County. But there is one bold transaction connected with the early history of Cabarrus, showing that the germs of liberty, at and before the battle of Alamance, in 1771, were ready to burst forth, at any moment, under the warmth of patriotic excitement, is here deemed worthy of conspicuous record. The “Black Boys” of Cabarrus County, North Carolina Western North...

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Cabarrus County, North Carolina Biographies

Biographical Sketches of Western North Carolina Illustrating Principally the Revolutionary Period of Mecklenburg, Rowan, Lincoln and Adjoining Counties of Burke, Cabarrus, Cleaveland, Gaston, Iredell, and Wilkes. The biographies have been extracted from this manuscript and presented here as part of our larger biographies collection. As with most historical manuscripts, these biographies should provide a glimpse into the genealogy of the leading men and the occasional women of the western North Carolina area.  Biography of Capt. Thomas Caldwell Biography of Dr. Charles...

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The “Black Boys” of Cabarrus County, North Carolina

Previous to the battle of Alamance, on the 16th of May, 1771, the first blood shed in the American Revolution, there were many discreet persons, the advocates of law and order, throughout the province, who sympathized with the justness of the principles which actuated the “Regulators,” and their stern opposition to official corruption and extortion, but did not approve of their hasty conduct and occasional violent proceedings. Accordingly, a short time preceding that unfortunate conflict, which only smothered for a time the embers of freedom, difficulties arose between Governor Tryon and the Regulators, when that royal official, in order to coerce them into his measures of submission, procured from Charleston, S.C., three wagon loads of the munitions of war, consisting of powder, flints, blankets, &c. These articles were brought to Charlotte, but from some suspicions arising in the minds of the Whigs as to their true destination and use, wagons could not be hired in the neighborhood for their transportation. At length, Colonel Moses Alexander, a magistrate under the Colonial Government, succeeded in getting wagons by “impressments”, to convey the munitions to Hillsboro, to obey the behests of a tyrannical governor. The vigilance of the jealous Whigs was ever on the lookout for the suppression of all such infringements upon the growing spirit of freedom, then quietly but surely planting itself in the hearts of the people. The following...

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Burke County, North Carolina History

Burke county was formed in 1777 from Rowan county, and was named in honor of the celebrated orator and statesman, Edmund Burke, an Irishman by birth, and possessed of all the warm and impetuous order of his countrymen. He early employed his pen in literature, and his eloquence in politics. Having been introduced to the Marquis of Rockingham, he made him his secretary and procured his election to the House of Commons. He there eloquently pleaded the cause of the Americans. During his political career he wrote much, and his compositions rank among the purest of English classics. This true friend of America died on the 8th of July, 1797, in the seventieth year of his age. At the commencement of the Revolutionary war the territory now lying on and near the eastern base of the “Blue Ridge,” or Alleghany chain of mountains, constituted the borders of civilization, and suffered frequently from marauding bands of Cherokee Indians, the great scourge of Western North Carolina. The whole country west of Tryon county (afterward Lincoln) was sparsely settled with the families of adventurous individuals, who, confronting all dangers, had carved out homes in the mountains and raised up hardy sons, deeply imbued with the spirit of liberty, prepared to go forth, at a moment’s warning, to fight the battles of their country. Battle of the Cowpens Western North...

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Burke County North Carolina Biographies

Biographical Sketches of Western North Carolina Illustrating Principally the Revolutionary Period of Mecklenburg, Rowan, Lincoln and Adjoining Counties of Burke, Cabarrus, Cleaveland, Gaston, Iredell, and Wilkes. The biographies have been extracted from this manuscript and presented here as part of our larger biographies collection. As with most historical manuscripts, these biographies should provide a glimpse into the genealogy of the leading men and the occasional women of the western North Carolina area. Biography of Colonel Benjamin...

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Battle of the Cowpens

“There was Greene in the South; you must know him,–Whom some called a ‘Hickory Quaker;’ But he ne’er turned his back on the foemen, Nor ever was known for a “shaker”.” After the unfortunate battle of Camden, on the 16th of August, 1780, where Gen. Gates lost the laurels he had obtained at Saratoga, Congress perceived the necessity of appointing a more efficient commander for the Southern army. Accordingly Gen. Washington was directed to make the selection from his well-tried and experienced officers. Whereupon the commander-in-chief appointed General Nathaniel Greene, late the Quartermaster General, on the 30th of October, 1780, who, in a few days afterward, set out for his field of labor. As he passed through Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, he ascertained what supplies it was likely could be obtained from those States; and leaving the Baron Steuben to take charge of the defense of Virginia he proceeded to Hillsboro, then the temporary seat of government for North Carolina. Gov. Nash received him with much joy, as the safety of the State was in imminent danger. After a short stay in that place he hastened on to Charlotte, the headquarters of the Southern army. Gen. Gates there met him with marked respect, without displaying any of those feelings which sometimes arise from disappointed ambition, and immediately set out for the headquarters of Washington, then in New Jersey, to...

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The Stamp Act of 1765

On the 22nd of March, 1765, the Stamp Act was passed. This act produced great excitement throughout the whole country, and no where was it more violently denounced than in North Carolina. The Legislature was then in session, and so intense and wide-spread was the opposition to this odious measure, that Governor Tryon, apprehending the passage of denunciatory resolutions, prorogued that body after a session of fifteen days. The speaker of the House, John Ashe, informed Governor Tryon that this law “would be resisted to blood and death.” Early in the year 1766, the sloop-of-war, Diligence, arrived in the Cape Fear River, having on board stamp paper for the use of the province. The first appearance and approach of the vessel had been closely watched, and when it anchored before the town of Brunswick, on the Cape Fear, Col. John Ashe, of the county of New Hanover, and Col. Hugh Waddell, of the county of Brunswick, marched at the head of the brave sons of these counties to Brunswick, and notified the captain of their determination to resist the landing of the stamps. They seized one of the boats of the sloop, hoisted it on a cart, fixed a mast in her, mounted a flag, and marched in triumph to Wilmington. The inhabitants all joined in the procession, and at night the town was illuminated. On the next day,...

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